Moving a Monolith to Kubernetes

 
English Intermediate Other

Our work with legacy code doesn’t often put us in a position to move quickly into new or trendy tooling. And while we almost always introduce Docker very early in our projects, it is usually only for the purpose of standardizing and easing setup of developer environments. Transitioning a live environment to containers, however, can be a daunting prospect. There are a variety of reasons for that, many of which you’ve probably encountered yourself, which include: 1. The application isn’t in the cloud yet 2. It’s too complicated 3. Container orchestration (like Kubernetes or Swarm) is too new/buggy/insecure 4. We need microservices to leverage Kubernetes 5. The application is a monolith All these might be valid reasons, but this talk will focus on our experiences in that last scenario — containerizing a monolith.

Speaker

M. Scott Ford

CEO at Corgibytes

M. Scott Ford is the Co-Founder & CEO of Corgibytes, where he has quietly led a software maintenance revolution for the past decade. Where most people find nothing but frustration, shame, and bugs in legacy code, Scott has centered his work around his genuine love of software modernization and helping others use joy, empathy, and technical excellence to make their systems more stable scalable and secure. Scott’s ideas have been featured in books such as The Innovation Delusion and as a guest lecturer at Harvard University. Scott is the author of three courses on LinkedIn Learning: Dealing With Legacy Code And Technical Debt, Code Quality, and Clean Coding Practices. He is the host of the podcast Legacy Code Rocks and enjoys helping other menders find a sense of belonging in a world dominated by makers.

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